Tagged: m16

Gunsmith moves with the times

Mr Aziz in his workshop Photo: Matt Cetti-Roberts

An interesting armoury item appeared in the War is Boring Blog this week. Written by Matt Cetti-Roberts, it tells the story of a day in the life of Bakhtiar Aziz who runs a family gunsmithing shop in Erbil, the Iraqi Kurdish capital.

Mr Aziz has been running the business since 1987 taking it over from his father. Originally it was focussed on repair of hunting weapons but, of course, since the war began things have changed.

Mr Aziz reports that 85% of weapons that pass through his shop for repair are Russian in origin, produced in the 1950s. The most common weapon is of course the AK47.

He also sees M16s which he repairs and converts to a carbine M4 type version. These weapons have done the rounds from the Iraqi Army to ISIS and then to the Peshmerga.

Apparently the cost of an M4 in Kurdistan is around USD5,000.00

As you might expect the business of gun repairs these days is brisk and sees Mr Aziz often working late into the night. Let’s hope that he can return to his core business of repairing sporting rifles sooner rather than later.


A Quick Look at the Heckler & Koch G36

One of the most common weapons we are asked to provide storage for is the H&K G36. The G36 followed a very interesting effort by H&K in tandem with others to produce a rifle using caseless ammunition (the G11). Dynamit Nobel designed some solid propellant which was heat resistant enough to overcome many of the traditional objections to this idea. In the end though, the cost of the G11 was high and so the project was scrapped and a replaced with a more conventional design.

After the initial order from the Bundeswehr it is interesting that the first wide scale deployment of the weapon was for the Spanish armed forces.

Of course, these days the weapon is now widely in use by both military and police in many countries around the world.

The G36 also formed the basis for the (eventually ill-fated) modular XM8 rifle which was developed as a result of an initiative by the US Army to replace the M16 and M4.

FWS weapon racking, of course, easily stores the G11, G36 and XM8 weapons! It actually demonstrates the future-proof nature of our racking that 3 design phases of a weapon spanning 30 years will all fit into 2 standard components that we produce.